21 responses

  1. Heather
    July 30, 2010

    I think this might be me…all my life! I like this!

    Reply

  2. charlotte
    July 30, 2010

    Wow! It is SO real. I can’t believe you have really experienced something like this. It is your writer’s gift no doubt. Congratulations!!

    Reply

  3. Jessica Larsen
    July 31, 2010

    Wow Emily! I really loved it! It is compelling and very relateable. I was there, and it brought back those “butterfiles” turning to “hornets” feelings. Cant wait to read the next one!

    Reply

  4. Amy F.
    July 31, 2010

    Great story! I can relate to so much of this story! This is so well written, and really fun to read!

    Reply

  5. Beth
    July 31, 2010

    Wow. You really, really nailed her perspective. Excellently done.

    Reply

  6. Lee Ann Elzey
    July 31, 2010

    Em, your story had great insights of a young High school girl’s world. Made me think back many years, back to our hometown. You have a lovely authors photo…..Congrats on publishing!
    Love you
    Lano

    Reply

  7. Connie
    July 31, 2010

    I think this is a great story! It really captures the true feelings of high school and all the insecurities that teens have while going through it.

    Reply

  8. Sarah Jane
    July 31, 2010

    Great story! I enjoyed it a lot – I’m glad to get to read what you are writing! It felt very real to me. I was rooting for the main character to have a bigger success, but I think more people relate to her this way. Nice job!

    Reply

  9. Amy
    July 31, 2010

    I can remember feeling exactly like this in high school, being chubby. I still haven’t completely gotten over that feeling that everything would be better if I could just lose weight, but I have learned that there are much better reasons to be active–like the things it enables you to physically be able to do and finding exercise you really love.

    Reply

  10. Brian
    August 1, 2010

    I’m almost 66 years of age and I really relate to this story. Eating is the physical and social highlight of my day. Gaining and losing weight is a constant challenge. Thanks for expressing the struggle so well.

    Reply

  11. Chris
    August 2, 2010

    Great story, but it gave me the shivers thinking back to high school. Did anyone really like those days? 🙂

    Reply

  12. Meghan
    August 12, 2010

    Great story, Emily. It was really interesting to read a story in 1st person. Thanks for inviting me to read it!

    Reply

  13. Kallan
    August 23, 2010

    I absolutely loved it! Great job! It was so easy to feel how she felt! You are truly an amazing writer!

    Reply

  14. Londy Leigh
    January 17, 2011

    I loved this story. Well done, Author! It grabbed me from the very first sentence.

    Reply

  15. Caroline O.
    June 5, 2011

    This short story, “In the Spotlight,” has been written with such an emotional and powerful attitude. I could truly relate to this story in some ways, and understand what the emotions and feelings of the protagonist mean. I truly loved how this writing was written with such wonderful use of literary devices– similes, metaphors, personifications, I could just go on and on… Truly a nice way Emily Deibel has captured a tiny part of a teenager’s experience through high school.

    Reply

  16. Natalie Boyd
    June 6, 2011

    It’s intriguing to see how often the way we see ourselves differs from those around us. I can’t recall how often I’ve declined invitations to go out with a group of people just because I felt I wasn’t truly wanted or I thought it might be “awkward”. But the truth is, you can’t ever really tell. Maybe we all should spend more time enjoying today, rather than obsessively worrying about tomorrow. And even though it’s great if others have a high opinion of you, isn’t self-approval the most gratifying? Thank you, author, for the thoughtful, relatable story.

    Reply

  17. Danielle Comorre
    June 8, 2011

    This story can relate to many high school students. We see ourselves as the lowest standards out there, especially if we aren’t one of the more popular ones. We are still kids!! Young and naive little creatures. We can get away with soda and pizza without having to worry about anything, because we still have people that love us for who we are. Emily Deibel did a great job at showing us that we need to live life in the moment like there’s no tomorrow, and not to compare yourself to those who may seem “better” than you. Just be the best that YOU are.

    Reply

  18. Hannah
    June 9, 2011

    I loved your descriptions in this story! Your descriptions make the story so easy to picture and visualize each moments of this high school girl in my head. I had a fun time reading this story and I felt the feelings of a typical high school girl. I really liked the last sentence of this story. “There’s always tomorrow”. It made me feel like my life was fast forwarded compared to everyone else’s. I was always worrying and thinking about the next day or even the next week. It gave me a thought that I should make the best of today. Thank you for the nice story.

    Reply

  19. Selene C.
    June 12, 2011

    Beautifully written. Seeing as how this comment is the nineteenth, I can’t say I’ll be saying something that hasn’t been said before. The fact that this has a second-person (I believe?) POV helps the reader really step into the shoes of the main character. I’ve never really suffered the problem that the protagonist does in the story, but the high school life and the symptoms of insecurity portrayed is/seems realistic enough – I can picture someone going through that.

    What I truly find interesting about this story is the ending: “She laughs and says something about the diet going out the window tonight.

    Tomorrow, you tell her, watching Ben get up from his chair and leave. You fill the frown on your face with another bite of greasy cheese and crust.

    There’s always tomorrow.”

    At first, I thought it was another classical “Look toward the future!” ending. But then I stared at it and thought a little bit more. The main character tells her friend that she will resume her diet tomorrow. You then give us an image of her stuffing her face with ‘greasy’ cheese and crust, which is followed instantly by “There’s always tomorrow”…

    Typical words of a procrastinator.

    That left me curious. What was going to happen to her? Would she follow through with her diet? Would she quit? When? After her senior year? Or the next week, confident in herself, no longer seeking a thin figure? Maybe unable to help herself, making the whole story a null portion of the protagonist’s life – a glimpse at what could have been?

    Given, it’s rather out of theme – a morbid interpretation of an optimistic ending of a story about determination – and “there’s always tomorrow” is as often said by achievers as by procrastinators (giving us the original optimism). If I reread the whole story, I’ll probably find some evidence refuting my observation, but I do see some black there.

    It’s probably just me though, so I’ll stop stretching your page with this lengthy comment.

    Reply

  20. Tara Rogers
    August 26, 2011

    Excellently written. You made me feel like I was her. I could relate easily. Great job!!

    Reply

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